Golden Garlic


I use garlic as an antibiotic but here is a technical bit on its properties from The Mail on LIne on London:

Lifesaver: Garlic oil contains an ingredient, diallyl trisulphide, that has the power to prevent the destruction of heart tissue. Garlic may provide protection against heart damage as well as vampires, research suggests.

The pungent bulb contains an ingredient that has the power to prevent the destruction of heart tissue which can lead to heart attacks. Scientists tested the compound, diallyl trisulfide, on mice at risk of heart damage from blocked coronary arteries.

Treatment just before blood flow was restored reduced the amount of heart tissue damaged by almost two-thirds. Diallyl trisulfide releases hydrogen sulphide, which has previously been shown to protect heart tissue in low concentrations.

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in the United States have turned to diallyl trisulfide, a garlic oil component, as a way to deliver the benefits of hydrogen sulphide to the heart.

Normally the unstable and volatile gas is difficult to deliver as a therapy because it needs to be injected. Now, thanks to garlic oil, it can be administered orally.

HYDROGEN SULFIDE: VERY USEFUL IN SMALL DOSES

In high concentrations, hydrogen sulfide is a strong poison: Just a few breaths can be fatal.
But in small amounts, like those the body makes naturally, hydrogen sulfide serves several key functions.

It reduces inflammation, lowers blood pressure and keeps cells alive.

After a heart attack or heart surgery has interrupted the flow of oxygen-rich blood to tissues, hydrogen sulfide allows oxygen to keep reaching the heart muscle.

Doctors could use diallyl trisulfide in many of the situations where researchers have proposed using hydrogen sulphide.

David Lefer, professor of surgery at Emory University School of Medicine, said: ‘We are now performing studies with orally active drugs that release hydrogen sulphide. ‘This could avoid the need to inject sulphide-delivery drugs outside of an emergency situation.’

Researchers blocked the coronary arteries of mice for 45 minutes, simulating a heart attack, and gave them diallyl sulphide just before blood flow was restored.

The compound reduced the proportion of damaged heart tissue in the area at risk by 61 per cent, compared with untreated animals.

The findings were presented today at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions meeting in Orlando, Florida. Further research reported by the team suggests diallyl trisulfide could also reduce heart enlargement caused by heart failure. (www.mailonline.com).

Stuart Wilde (www.stuartwilde.com)

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